Another interesting concept from the creator of Hexcells, but keep in mind it is pretty short - probably around 2-3 hours if you're familiar with the concept of the other games.

This one adds a little extra complication by introducing multiplication, as well as multi-directional numbers. So the row multiplied forwards and backwards has to match the numbers on either end.

This was a nice twist, although I sort of wish it showed a subtotal by each required number so that you wouldn't have to repeatedly figure out tough rows in your head. It's a bit much having to add and multiply a series of numbers 5-10 times forward and backward to work out the combination that fits.

Overall though, another unique and interesting creation that will please puzzle fans for a couple hours.

CasualIndiePuzzleStrategyLink
As of 12/29/17 this still feels very much like an early access concept that needs tweaking and ease of use upgrades before I'd recommend it. The micromanagement required for gathering resources is pretty high, having to select each type of resource independently and the area you want them to gather within.

I'd much prefer a classic RTS type gathering where the AI is a bit smarter than a dumb drone. And as much as I like being able to research and add a trailer to carry buildings with the caravan, I don't know why this isn't default. Seems odd to have to build new buildings every 10 minutes when you switch maps.

Additionally the level-end timer doesn't give you any obvious indicator that your time is about to run out - if you're not paying attention you can lose the game very abruptly.

Coffee Pot Terrarium [Steam store page]
A gorgeous little mobile port that doesn't give you any explanation of how to play it. And it also has poor click tracking, often not using your actions unless you click the tiles very precisely.

It has 21 levels total, and three simple actions for your character to perform. Although the random heights of the tiles created by the Raise Tile action seems antithetical to the puzzles. Since you can only walk to tiles that are the same or one different from your current height, this height randomness can ruin a perfectly good strategy.

There are probably some advanced features or uses for the abilities that I haven't yet figured out in the first 6 levels, but I feel like that's the game's fault for not clearly explaining the rules so the player can focus on strategy and winning, not trial and error.

Train Valley [Steam store page]
Starts out simple, but to be really good at this game you have to be able to multi-task incredibly accurately and quickly. That just isn't me, but the game is well designed and will be fun for people who love the challenge of optimizing their strategy and reaction times to climb the leaderboard.

Rise: Battle Lines [Steam store page]
Bare-bones little game using the strategy elements you see in many hex turn-based games as almost a single-player puzzle. This part is short though, a couple hours, and probably just meant as training for the multiplayer component.

It's lacking any story, art, or variation that usually elevates this sort of single-player experience beyond rock-paper-scissors combat, and unfortunately the multiplayer doesn't have a useful number of players, so you'll have to bring your own friends if you want to try it.

I want to like this game, but while the graphics are gorgeous and the flying feels good, the content is lacking and inconsistent. The difficulty curve is polar opposites most of the time, either you're dominating the enemy or dying very quickly, and there's little to do besides pick up resources and shoot enemies.

The EVERSPACE - Encounters DLC pack sounds like it adds some actual mission content, but I haven't played that so I don't know if it's actually satisfying, and it's silly to be charged extra for what should have been part of the base game. Granted the game+dlc is $40, not $60 like AAA titles, but it also has a lot less content than one too.

I give them credit for the weapon design and feel though - each of the main ones is unique and feels powerful if used correctly. And although there are only three ship types they each play completely differently. It's just too bad they didn't add a decent variety of gameplay to go with them.

HunieCam Studio [Steam store page]
It seems like a lot of people like this game, but it's average at best, with the quality declining the more time you spend playing it. Basically it's a shallow clicker game, which surprised me since the store page seems to imply a bit more strategy and management.

Instead it just tries to keep you occupied clicking a handful of different buildings instead of adding any real depth. I'm sure you can optimize it slightly to get a higher score, but there aren't even semi-deep strategy or mechanics here.

As a side note, this game is tagged 'Nudity', but does not contain any as far as I can tell - unlike other games like HuniePop from the same creator.

Hidden Folks [Steam store page]
A bit like Where's Waldo, but sometimes you have to click (or drag) on one or more items to reveal the person you're looking for. Each target has a hint though, which gives you an idea of the area or action you need to find it.

I was surprised at how expansive some of these drawings are - you can pan around, and often it helps to zoom in rather than staying at max distance, especially when looking for a small object. And with the complexity of these drawings it will probably take you at least a few hours to find all the targets.

A great combination of music, nice visuals, and a unique style of light strategy. Easy enough for casual players, with Bastion type difficulty settings.

The art is bright and fun, but the narrator really makes this game fantastic - narrating every move as you shoot and smash your way through the story.

Although the controls are really rough (it really should be point-and-click instead), it's still an intriguing story in an interesting environment.

An abstract world with two dimensions that will bend your mind trying to keep track of the switches that move portals or even the level itself.

Just Get Through [Steam store page]
If you mash together the responsiveness of Super Meat Boy, and the randomness of Spelunky, you get a simple but satisfying randomized platformer.

Hotline Miami [Steam store page]
Prepare to enjoy smashing open heads with a bat, slitting throats, and shooting enemies at breakneck speed in a psychedelic environment.

Hexcells Plus [Steam store page]
Basically the same as Hexcells, just adding another set of levels - since this game doesn't randomly generate them (unless you buy Hexcells Infinite).

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