Warlock's Tower [Steam store page]
I quite enjoyed this, although about 45 minutes in I'm already 100% done with 2 out of 5 worlds and well on my way to finishing the third, and the game still doesn't seem as "punishing" as the store description would lead you to believe.

There's no downside to losing or restarting a level, and the "brutal rule" of one move, one life lost, is the core puzzle mechanic of the game - you count your steps to nearby life pickups, and figure out the order you need to survive.

This gets more challenging when enemies move at certain intervals as well, but I only found one level so far where that really complicated matters. Overall it was a relaxing and enjoyable puzzle experience so far.

DifficultIndiePuzzleRetroLink
Another interesting concept from the creator of Hexcells, but keep in mind it is pretty short - probably around 2-3 hours if you're familiar with the concept of the other games.

This one adds a little extra complication by introducing multiplication, as well as multi-directional numbers. So the row multiplied forwards and backwards has to match the numbers on either end.

This was a nice twist, although I sort of wish it showed a subtotal by each required number so that you wouldn't have to repeatedly figure out tough rows in your head. It's a bit much having to add and multiply a series of numbers 5-10 times forward and backward to work out the combination that fits.

Overall though, another unique and interesting creation that will please puzzle fans for a couple hours.

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Coffee Pot Terrarium [Steam store page]
A gorgeous little mobile port that doesn't give you any explanation of how to play it. And it also has poor click tracking, often not using your actions unless you click the tiles very precisely.

It has 21 levels total, and three simple actions for your character to perform. Although the random heights of the tiles created by the Raise Tile action seems antithetical to the puzzles. Since you can only walk to tiles that are the same or one different from your current height, this height randomness can ruin a perfectly good strategy.

There are probably some advanced features or uses for the abilities that I haven't yet figured out in the first 6 levels, but I feel like that's the game's fault for not clearly explaining the rules so the player can focus on strategy and winning, not trial and error.

Train Valley [Steam store page]
Starts out simple, but to be really good at this game you have to be able to multi-task incredibly accurately and quickly. That just isn't me, but the game is well designed and will be fun for people who love the challenge of optimizing their strategy and reaction times to climb the leaderboard.

Hidden Folks [Steam store page]
A bit like Where's Waldo, but sometimes you have to click (or drag) on one or more items to reveal the person you're looking for. Each target has a hint though, which gives you an idea of the area or action you need to find it.

I was surprised at how expansive some of these drawings are - you can pan around, and often it helps to zoom in rather than staying at max distance, especially when looking for a small object. And with the complexity of these drawings it will probably take you at least a few hours to find all the targets.

Tomb Raider [Steam store page]
This franchise reboot was very satisfying, an appropriate start for the character we know Lara Croft will turn into eventually.

Although the controls are really rough (it really should be point-and-click instead), it's still an intriguing story in an interesting environment.

An abstract world with two dimensions that will bend your mind trying to keep track of the switches that move portals or even the level itself.

Just Get Through [Steam store page]
If you mash together the responsiveness of Super Meat Boy, and the randomness of Spelunky, you get a simple but satisfying randomized platformer.

Hexcells Plus [Steam store page]
Basically the same as Hexcells, just adding another set of levels - since this game doesn't randomly generate them (unless you buy Hexcells Infinite).

Hexcells Infinite [Steam store page]
While the random-map generation isn't quite as challenging as it should be, I still really enjoy the Hexcells series - they're a modernized Minesweeper.

Minesweeper on steroids - this is a great take on the genre, adding a lot more elements while still keeping a good deductive feel.

Needs a faster fast forward, and has a few annoyances if you're trying to get Expert achievements - but the normal gameplay is fun and well designed.

For me this game fell somewhere between Legend of Grimrock and Legend of Grimrock 2 - not quite as good as the open-world of the second game, but Vaporum's voice acting made it more of an engaging experience than the original Grimrock.

Quern - Undying Thoughts [Steam store page]
A really enjoyable first-person puzzle game, with unique challenges and an attractive environment.

You may need a game guide now and then, because the island is expansive, but the majority of the puzzles can be solved by logic rather than guesswork. The exceptions are ones where you may not realize a game mechanic is possible.

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